“Game Night” Review


Max (Jason Bateman) and Annie (Rachel McAdams) are a very competitive couple. Everything about their relationship – from their meeting, engagement, and marriage – involves some sort of game or contest between the two, as established by an entertaining opening montage that quickly sets the tone of John Francis Daley and Jonathan Goldstein’s Game Night. Part of Max’s competitive nature stems from constantly feeling inferior to his older brother Brooks (Kyle Chandler), a problem that isn’t helped when Brooks comes into town and suggests throwing Max and Annie’s weekly game night at his new place. The game suggested by Brooks involves a member of their group being suddenly kidnapped, with the winner being the first player to find them. Sure enough, armed men soon burst into the room and kidnap Brooks to the amusement of everyone in the room, who are completely oblivious of the fact that he’s really being kidnapped.

Mark Perez’s screenplay offers a clever premise with plenty of potential for unique comedic moments, and like the best game nights keeps the rules fairly simple to instead let the players (or audience) just enjoy the company they’re in. Joining Max and Annie are Kevin and Michelle (Lamorne Morris and Kylie Bunbury), high-school sweethearts who realise over the course of the night that they haven’t been as faithful to each other as they thought, and Ryan and Sarah (Billy Magnussen and Sharon Horgan). Ryan is their moronic friend trying to defend his own intelligence by bringing an older, smarter woman than his usual game night dates with the witty and British Sarah. Admittedly I found Ryan’s stupidity a tiring character trait, stretching credibility and raising questions of why anyone in the group bothered to spend their time with him, but Sarah’s bemused acceptance of the night’s events does balance him well. Lurking in the shadows is Jesse Plemons as Officer Gary, a frighteningly intense man who used to attend the group’s game nights with his wife but is left out after their separation. Plemons plays his character more like the lead suspect in a Law and Order episode than a supporting role in a comedy, and the delightfully uncomfortable humour that comes from his interactions with the rest of the cast make for one of Game Night’s strongest selling points.

Game Night is largely built on the chemistry between Bateman and McAdams, with Bateman’s finely honed deadpan humour addressing some of the more absurd moments while McAdams, a captivating screen-presence in any genre, brings a joyousness to even the darkest situations. The scene when Annie has to remove a bullet from Max’s arm brings the biggest laughs as the two treat the task in front of them like a morbid round of ‘Operation’. Daley and Goldstein cleverly make much of the film feel like part of a game, employing clever CGI to make the establishing shots resemble figures on a board or turning serious moments into elaborate matches of keep-away or charades.

Unfortunately the rules do become a bit too complex as Perez’s screenplay tries to throw countless twists and turns into the final act, and it was around the point that Max and Annie are driving a car through the wheels of a moving plane that I started wondering what had happened to the simple premise I’d been enjoying so much for the first hour. The supporting cast are so strong that when they’re unceremoniously pushed to the side for the climax the film does lose the mix of camaraderie and competition that had moved things along so smoothly at first, even if Bateman and McAdams are strong enough performers to keep things relatively grounded as the stakes become increasingly overblown. Even if the plot does lose sight of itself towards the end, Game Night manages to stay as fun and entertaining at the name suggests. This is very much a film that should be watched with a group of friends on a night out, and I’d definitely be up for another night in these characters’ company if a sequel comes along.

3 and a half stars.

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